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Migration and Integration in Europe: Towards a Joined-Up Framework for Integrating Non-EU Nationals

Key Speakers

Eva Schultz, DG Home Affairs, European Commission
Anna Platonova, Project Manager, Independent Network of Labour Migration and Integration Experts, International Organization for Migration
Patrick Taran, Senior Migration Specialist, International Labour Organisation
Anna Ludwinek, CLIP Project, EUROFOUND
Prof. Ruth Ferrero Turrion, Faculty of Political Science and Sociology, Universidad Complutense of Madrid
Prof. Gudrun Biffl, Head, Department of Migration and Globalisation, Danube University Krems, Austria

Over the last few decades international migration and globalisation has influenced the public policy agenda across Europe and the wider world. In Europe alone there has been a steady increase in the flow of resident immigrants, with the European Commission putting the number at approximately 18.5m, or nearly 4% of the EU’s total population.

These figures clearly demonstrate that the EU is one of the foremost migration destinations globally, and this is without considering second and third generation migrants born in Europe. The complexities of migration and integration, and its impact on the economic and public policy of individual member states, as well as the EU as a whole, need to be approached in a more joined-up and sustainable manner.

Establishing a coherent European migration and integration policy framework is a complex and ongoing process, requiring greater regularisation with regards to reunification policy, national quotas, political asylum seekers and the nationalisation of long term residents. Empowering communities, NGOs and relevant agencies at national and regional level, as well as fostering discussion and cultural exchange, should all be steps towards the creation of a successful and sustainable platform for integrating non-EU nationals into the European community.

In order to achieve a successful integration framework for migrants it is necessary to establish shared forums for the discussion and exchange of best practices, as well as building strategic alliances between governments, social researchers, the media and civil societies, so as to provide a continuous intercultural dialogue aimed at improving and stimulating living conditions in all local areas.

The Centre for Parliamentary studies in cooperation with Public Policy Exchange is proud to continue its migration platform for discussion and exchange of good practices. We welcome the participation of all key partners, responsible authorities and stakeholders. The Symposium will support the exchange of ideas and encourage delegates to engage in thought-provoking topical debate.

Programme

09:00 Registration and Morning Refreshments
10:00 Co - chair’s Welcome and Opening Remarks

Dr. Tugba Basaran, Lecturer at the School of Politics and International Relations and Convener of the Master in International Development, Brussels School of International Studies, University of Kent c/o
Richard Lewis, Migration and Diversity Specialist, The Institute for European Studies, Vrije Universiteit Brussels (confirmed)
10:10 Panel Session One:
Economic Integration of Non-EU Nationals
  • Shaping Common EU Legal Migration Policy – Challenges and Opportunities
  • Current Challenges and Recent Initiatives
  • Sharing Good Practices
Speaker:
Anna Platonova, Project Manager, Independent Network of Labour Migration and Integration Experts, International Organization for Migration (confirmed)
10:30 First Round of Discussions
11:00 Morning Coffee Break
11:20 Panel Session Two:
Integration and Migration of Non-EU Nationals – Lessons Learned and Good Practices
  • EU Selection and Admission Systems – Challenges and Future Opportunities
  • Facilitating Migration and Social and Economic Integration of Non-EU Nationals
  • Common European Modules for Migrant Integration
Speakers:
Eva Schultz, DG Home Affairs, European Commission (confirmed)
Dr. Alessia Di Pascale, Faculty of Law, University of Milan (confirmed)
12:00 Second Round of Discussions
12:30 Networking Lunch
13:30 Panel Session Three:
Best Practices in Integrating Migrants in the European Labour Market at National and Local Levels


  • Existing Measures, Government Procedures and Campaigns and Good Practices
  • Access To Jobs and Education Opportunities
  • Assessment of Skills and Qualifications
  • Creating Intercultural Environment and Fostering Intercultural Dialogue
  • Recommendations for Future Policy Actions
Speakers:
Patrick Taran, Senior Migration Specialist, International Labour Organisation (confirmed)
Anna Ludwinek, CLIP Project, EUROFOUND (confirmed)
14:10 Third Round of Discussions
14:40 Afternoon Coffee Break
14:55 Panel Session Four:
Towards New Concepts with Comprehensive Information and Monitoring Tools on Migration and Integration
  • Multi-Level Approach and Best Practices
  • Empowering and Involving Society as a Whole
  • Integration through Employment
  • Recommendations for Future Policy Actions
Speakers:
Prof. Ruth Ferrero Turrion, Faculty of Political Science and Sociology, Universidad Complutense of Madrid (confirmed)
Prof. Gudrun Biffl, Head, Department of Migration and Globalisation, Danube University Krems, Austria (confirmed)
15:35 Fourth Round of Discussions
16:05 Chair’s Summary and Closing Remarks
16:10 Networking Reception and Refreshments
16:40 Symposium Close
26th May 2011
Silken Hotel, Brussels

how to get to the venue


Register your place

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“ Legal migration and integration of third-country nationals are part of an important debate today across the European Union … Some countries, including the new Member States, have only recently been faced with immigration. Others have dealt with immigration and integration challenges for decades but not always with satisfactory results, and they are consequently revising their policies. Reflecting the different histories, traditions and institutional arrangements, there are a wide variety of approaches being taken to find solutions to the problems which need to be tackled. The EU is developing common approaches for integration and is promoting the exchange of best practices. ”
DG Home Affairs, European Commission
“ The Commission will explore various concepts of participation and citizenship and their influence on the integration process. Platforms for discussion involving stakeholders and immigrants' representatives will be encouraged at all levels. The Commission will also examine the added value of common European modules for migrant integration based on existing good practice to develop guidelines on various aspects of the integration process (introductory courses, promoting participation of immigrants and other citizens in local life, etc).” ”
Third Annual Report on Migration and Integration, COM (2007) 512 final
“ EU economies face a structural need for seasonal work for which labour from within the EU is expected to become less and less available. As regards future skills shortages in the EU, traditional sectors will continue to play an important role and the structural need for low-skilled and low-qualified workers is likely to continue expanding. It should also be pointed out that there is a more permanent need for unskilled labour within the EU. It is expected to be increasingly difficult to fill these gaps with EU national workers, primarily owing to the fact that these workers consider seasonal work unattractive. ”
Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of seasonal employment, COM (2010) 379 final